The University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 10.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

How to Incorporate Technology and Staffing into your Medical/Surgical Travel Healthcare Practice
One patient with a bad medical tourism experience has the potential to seriously hurt your hospital’s image and ruin years of marketing efforts Unfortunately, very few providers possess a clear understanding of the international patient market or how to address the needs and expectations of international patients, insurance companies or facilitators, regardless of their country of origin. After this 2 hour session participants will be able to…

  • Rate your effectiveness in utilizing web-based technologies to educate and engage your patients.
  • Evaluate potential barriers that might block potential patients from choosing or recommending your medical/surgical travel practice.
  • Identify services, infrastructure, amenities and attitudes that your medical/surgical travel patients expect.
  • Explain the important role of international case managers and the patient preoperative care team in improving patient outcomes and patient satisfaction.
  • Kelly Meloche, Founder, International Health Care Providers
  • Anuja Agrawal, Technology Advisor, Medical Tourism Association and CEO, HealthFlights Technology, Inc.
Risk Mitigation & Management Policies & Practices for International Patients
With the growth of medical travel and trans border patient migration, stakeholders are increasingly having to navigate not only the complex legal issues confronting such encounters but also the risks and uncertainties associated with litigating cross-border disputes. This 2 hour session will examine some of the common legal issues that give rise to disputes in the medical travel industry and options for resolving them through alternative dispute resolution mechanisms. The presenters will also discuss practical tips for structuring cross-border relationships to minimize the risk of litigation. After this session the participant will be able to…

  • Assess your patient’s pre travel pre operative medical/surgical risk.
  • Reduce your patient’s medical/surgical travel risk and complications by utilizing medical travel recommended protocols.
  • Reduce your practice’s risk through the utilization of patient consent, and medical travel assessments.
  • Assess your practice’s risk and liability for medical/surgical patient travel.
  • Scott A. Edelstein, Partner, Squire Sanders
  • Kelly A. Leahy, Senior Attorney, Squire Sanders
Corporate Wellness as an Integral part of your Medical/Surgical Travel Healthcare Practice
An increasing number of employers and corporations focus on employee health and wellness in order to get their employees and plan members to engage in healthy behavior as a way to reduce healthcare and health insurance costs. After this session the participant will be able to…

  • Explain what organizational policies help promote employee health and wellness clinical medical care.
  • Assess how the growth of lifestyle disease might increase the demand for corporate wellness programs.
  • Analyze how corporate wellness clinical programs can benefit medical/surgical travel patients in your clinical practice or hospital.
  • Determine the steps, staffing and support your practice/hospital will need to develop to integrate a wellness practice into your clinical practice
  • William B. Baun, EPD, CWP, FAWHP – Wellness Officer, MD Anderson
Applying a Proactive Risk Assessment Approach to Patient Safety
Although hospitals, clinics, and doctor’s offices take many steps to keep their patients safe, medical errors can happen. Often, medical errors happen when there is a single misstep in a chain of activities. This session will teach attendees how to:

  • Analyze ways to mitigate patient/practice risk to medical/surgical travel.
  • Employ clinical barriers to prevent patient/practice risk.
  • Contrast patient/practice reduction risk approaches and techniques.
  • Exam your practice’s monitoring and accountability process in patient/practice risk reduction.
  • Karen Timmons, Global Patient Safety Officer, Det Norske Veritas (DNV)
Understanding Domestic Medical Travel
One aspect of medical tourism that is gaining popularity among US Employers is domestic medical tourism, often referred to as regional medical tourism, where patients travel from one region to another within their country. In this CME approved session, participants will learn:

  • Contrast the unique clinical risk/benefit features of domestic medical/surgical to international medical/surgical travel.
  • Demonstrate how domestic medical/surgical travel might benefit patient outcomes.
  • Dramatize how employers might help reduce healthcare cost and improve patient clinical outcomes through domestic medical/surgical travel.
  • Identify clinical and nonclinical team members of a domestic medical/surgical travel practice/hospital.
  • Rosanna Gomez Moreno, JD, Partner, McMains Moreno Global Consultants
  • Simon Hudson, PhD, Endowed Chair for the Center of Economic Excellence, University of South Carolina
Guidelines for International Patient Management during Pre-Treatment
The international market has unique needs and expectations that must be addressed for your international program to be successful. There are medical and non-medical services that must be managed through different stages of the care process. Many of the most important stages in the patient experience occur well before the medical procedure. After this 2 hour session participants will be able to

  • Formulate pre-screening clinical protocols for new medical/surgical travel patients
  • Integrate pre-travel pre-treatment patient clinical pathways.
  • Examine and identify clinical documentation necessary for medical/surgical traveling patients.
  • Evaluate the primary care physician’s role in pre-travel pre-treatment.
  • William Cook, Manager International Patient Services, Medical Tourism Association
  • Kevin Huffman, MD, Medical Director, Medical Travel Associates
Telehealth and Medical Tourism
Telehealth is on the forefront of the changing paradigm of medical tourism and the entire healthcare industry. All healthcare professionals in the medical tourism industry must keep up with the latest trends and know how to best integrate telehealth into their practice. This session will teach participants how to:

  • Describe the role of telehealth in reducing risk and improving patient outcomes in medical/surgical travel.
  • Evaluate current telehealth and patient connectivity technologies for physician practices.
  • Use examples of successful telehealth applications to illustrate how telehealth can be used in medical/surgical travel to reduce risk and improve patient outcomes.
  • Examine challenging of integrating telehealth into your practice or hospital to reduce patient risk and improve patient outcomes.
  • Scott C. Simmons, Director of TeleHealth, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
Managing the International Patient/Doctor Relationship
The doctor–patient relationship is central to the practice of healthcare and is essential for the delivery of high-quality health care in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. A patient must have confidence in the competence of their physician and must feel that they can confide in him or her. Establishing a good rapport and strong sense of trust with an international patient often poses a much bigger challenge for a doctor. This session will teach participants how to:

  • Assess the primary care physician’s role along with the destination physician/surgeon role in their patient’s medical/surgical treatment plans.
  • Illustrate the principles of your patient’s continuum of care throughout the medical/surgical travel process.
  • Identify the Joe Montana Jersey clinical pathways, clinical outcomes and risk assessment of the destination physician/surgical to reduce patient risk and improve patient outcomes.
  • Categorize steps to improve your patients’ medical/surgical travel through cultural competency.
  • Kevin Huffman, MD, Medical Director, Medical Travel Associates
The Importance of Cultural Competency in International Patient Care
Medical tourism brings people of different cultures and backgrounds together in a unique way. Culturally and linguistically appropriate services help improve the quality of healthcare that your organization provides. Session participants will be able to…

  • Identify staffing, services and infrastructure that will improve cultural competency within your practice to help patients reach best outcomes.
  • Diagram steps your practice/hospital can take to enhance patient outcomes through improved cultural competency.
  • Explain how improve cultural competency might improve patient outcomes and reduce patient risk.
  • Measure patient outcomes and risk reduction results following the implementation of cultural competency.
  • Mouhanad Hammami, MD, Health Officer & Chief of Health Operations, Health & Human Services, Wayne County, Michigan
Achieving Sustainable Improvement & Market Differentiation through Clinical Quality Improvement
Clinical Quality Improvement is a vital component for Joe Montana Authentic Jersey any hospital to achieving sustainable improvement. It can also be key as a hospital seeks to differentiate itself in the market. This session will explore the scope of quality improvement capacity in various developmental stages and identify the criteria for clinical indicators in quality improvement, common trends in quality improvement initiatives and subsequent market effects. After this session the participant will be able to:

  • Identify the most common medical/surgical travel treatments/procedures which your patient might choose and why.
  • Discuss the scope of quality improvement capacity in various developmental stages
  • Examine strategies for establishing centers of excellence clinical care status for your medical/surgical practice or hospitals
  • Identify criteria for clinical indicators in quality improvement
  • Discuss the benefits of achieving sustainable improvement and how to measure impact of clinical quality improvement
  • Mary Miller, Manager, Continuous Quality Improvement, Medical Tourism Association (MTA)
Continuum of Care Protocols for International Patients
The patient’s experience does not end after the medical procedure. It can continue for weeks afterwards and careful attention must be paid especially when treating an international patient. It is important for doctors, nurses, hospital staff and medical tourism facilitators to understand how to best ensure that the patient make a full recovery. After this session, attendees will be able to…

  • Illustrate the pre travel pretreatment and post travel post treatment clinical pathways for your traveling patients.
  • Identify your role as the patient’s primary care physician in the travel continuum of care.
  • Identify the role of the destination physician/surgeon, hospital, nurse and case manager in risk reduction and patient clinical care.
  • Analyze potential risk and clinical care deficiencies in medical/surgical travel practices, hospitals and aftercare facilities.
  • Kevin Huffman, MD, Medical Director, Medical Travel Associates
The Roles and Responsibilities of Physicians In Patients' Decisions About Unproven Stem Cell Therapies
Capitalizing on the hype surrounding stem cell research, numerous clinics around the world offer “stem cell therapies” for a variety of medical conditions. Because these unproven treatments pose risks to individual patients and to legitimate translational stem cell research, stem cell tourism has generated substantial policy concern and inspired attempts to reduce these risks through the development of guidelines for patients and medical practitioners. This session will examine the roles and responsibilities of physicians in patients’ home countries with respect to patients’ decisions to try unproven stem cell therapies abroad. Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify your professional and legal obligations to your patients who are considering unproven stem cell therapies.
  • Describe the role you play in your patients’ decisions to undergo unproven stem cell therapy.
  • Evaluate your risk and legal responsibilities in your patient’s decision to undergo unproven stem cell therapy.
  • Discuss strategies to help improve the clinical guidance physicians provide to patients considering unproven treatments.
  • Leslie E. Wolf, J.D., Professor, Georgia State University’s College of Law
Best Practices in Pre-Travel/Pre-Operative for International Patients
  • List three questions that should be asked prior to travel regarding financial responsibility of surgical cost, cost of complications and postoperative care cost.
  • List four questions to ask the destination surgeon regarding his/her qualifications?
  • What complication is the most common type of complication that can threaten the surgical patient’s life or prolong the patient’s hospital stay?
  • When should the pre-operative H& Joe Montana Womens Jersey P be completed?
  • List two reasons why a ‘fit for flight” exam just prior to surgery is a wise decision.
  • Kevin Huffman, MD, Medical Director, Medical Travel Associates
Best Practices in Post-Travel/Post-Operative for International Patients
  • List the four phases of post-operative complications.
  • List three possible causes of fever in post-operative day 3 to 5.
  • List four late post-operative complications.
  • Describe the diet progression for a bariatric surgical patient.
  • List the typical post-operative PCP follow up visit schedule.
  • Kevin Huffman, MD, Medical Director, Medical Travel Associates
Advances in Orthopedic Sports Medicine & Athletic Longevity
  • Basic understanding of relative anatomy of knee and shoulder as it applies to sports medicine injuries
  • The differences between cartilage, ligament and meniscus injury to the knee and the current state-of-the-art options of surgical and nonsurgical treatment
  • A basic understanding of the aging athletes shoulder conditions. Including the differences between rotator cuff, arthritis and other traumatic injuries
  • The importance of treating articular cartilage injuries of the knee, the available biologic options and the sequela of non-treatment resulting in arthritis
  • The differences between partial and full knee replacements. Indications, limitations and the advantages of robotic guided systems.
  • A basic understanding of the current state-of-the-art Biologics in sports medicine. The differences between PRPand stem cell therapies.
  • The coordinated use of the exercise prescription for orthopedic sports medicine injuries post surgery
  • Jonathan L. Glashow, M.D., Board Certified orthopedic surgeon and Co-Chief of Sports Medicine Orthopedics, Mount Sinai Medical Center
The Importance of Patient/Physician Communication Before and After Travel

 

  • Explain the importance of two way communication between doctor and patient before and after travel.
  • Illustrate the steps in my T-Chart process and how to use the T-Chart as a communication tool pre/post travel.
  • Categorize steps the patient and doctor can use to maintain a high level of communication and trust via long distance.
  • Assess the impact culture plays in communication.
  • Identify methods of communication that can used pre/post travel.
  • Describe strengths and weaknesses of various types of long distance communication between doctor and patient.
  • Examine communication techniques used in my own personal experience to illustrate a strong Joe Montana Youth Jersey doctor/patient relationship.
  • Cristy Kessler, Ed.D., NBCT, Patient Advocate, Motivational Speaker
How to Create an “Elite” Patient Experience
  • Understand the importance of the “patient experience” beyond just treating their medical condition.
  • Identify characteristics of a uniquely appreciated “patient experience.”
  • Cite criteria and latest data regarding today’s new medicine service standards.
  • Lanalee Araba Sam, MD, Director of Women’s Health, Florida Medical Center

 

How to Incorporate Technology into your Medical/Surgical Travel Practice
  • Rate your effectiveness in utilizing web-based technologies to educate and engage your patients.
  • Evaluate potential barriers that might block potential patients from choosing or recommending your medical/surgical travel practice.
  • Identify services, infrastructure, amenities and attitudes that your medical/surgical travel patients expect.
  • Explain the important role of international case managers and the patient perioperative care team in improving patient outcomes and patient satisfaction.
  • Anuja Agrawal, CEO, Health Flights Solutions
Quality, Cost & Value: How to Deliver Value-Based Care that Ensures Positive Outcomes
  • Analyze and define Value-Based Care
  • Demonstrate how to create or design methodologies for improvement in the care process
  • Demonstrate how to identify opportunities for productivity
  • Distinguish most impactful interventions towards positive outcomes
  • Design, Test and Spread methods to improve quality across clinical services.

 

  • Mary B. Miller, Manager, Continuous Quality Improvement, Medical Tourism Association
Making it Safe: How to Make your Hospital More Attractive to the Medical Traveler
  • Teach physicians who wish to enhance their reputation with potential international patients how to require everyone in the organization, every day to identify unsafe conditions in a real time system and to share problems so that everyone can learn and help to prevent future occurrences and assure that every manager is trained, freed up, and held directly accountable to immediately solve problems when they are identified and build the same capacity in all the people with whom they work.
  • Inspire those at the top of international healthcare organizations to adapt their schedules to allow time to diagnose the log of problems every day to understand the organizational problems that need to be solved.
  • Provide training for people who work with international medical tourists to be able to solve problems in real time to root cause. This training helps people learn that a person is never the root cause of a problem, that the people who are best equipped to understand and solve problems are the people who do the work and that all root causes lead to an undefined activity, unclear customer/supplier connection, pathway of customers and suppliers that is unspecified or “”forked,”” or the lack of scientific-method-based problem solving.
  • Learn how to continually adapt the organization designed to care for medical tourists to be able to respond instantaneously to problems by distributing the authority to change work and by universally sharing learning from each change so that future mistakes are prevented.
  • Explore the realm of possibility at international medical tourist provider organizations to target zero. Learn why only by setting goals of perfection can every worker be conditioned to see every problem as an opportunity for learning and how strong leaders can stop the cycle of problems and create the safety to tell the truth and the management systems to address every error.
  • Give real-life examples of how to use the scientific method to address safety concerns and how the CEO of an organization that provides care to international medical patients can help lead a process that eliminates whole classes of system errors and creates a place where everyone in the organization can learn. This “”learning laboratory”” allows the organization to test ways to get to the system roots of problems and how to change the organization’s design and the staff’s work to match the needs of customers
  • Provide leaders of hospitals that care for international patients a framework for dramatically improving quality indicators and fostering a culture where people at all levels feel empowered to report errors of all kinds. This way the organization can meet its customer’s needs perfectly and concentrate every resource to enable every employee in the organization to adapt and achieve that vision.
  • Clifton N. Orme, FACHE, President & COO , International Hospital Management Corporation

Individuals needing accommodation under ADA should contact info@medicaltourismcongress.com in a timely manner.

ACCREDITATION:

ACCREDITATION

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of The University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine and Medical Tourism Association.  The University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

CREDIT HOURS:

The University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 10.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

DISCLOSURE AND CONFLICT OF INTEREST RESOLUTION:
All conflicts of interest of any individual(s) in a position to control the content of this CME activity will be identified and resolved prior to this educational activity being provided. Disclosure about provider and faculty relationships, or the lack thereof, will be provided to learners.